Woman and online dating

Most of us have commiserated over drinks about the countless conversations that go nowhere, the great conversations that result in terrible dates, or the amazing dates that end in radio silence.

We can console ourselves with the knowledge that dating sites are marketplaces filled with choice and opportunity, and when faced with infinite choices, you’re less likely to choose.

Another survey found that ‘basic’ ladies are steaming hot: Potential love interests are 8% more likely to reach out to a woman who has the words “pumpkin spice” somewhere on her dating profile, than they were to those who didn’t mention the fall drink.

That’s according to a survey of 2,800 singles released this week by dating site Plenty of Fish, which concluded that “ladies may want to consider putting the words ‘pumpkin spice’ in their online dating profile.” (The same did not hold true for men.) This is mixed news for the dating set.

To be fair, I’ve also learned this by being a black woman.

In an effort to preserve sanity, I discovered very early that what is good and beautiful about me doesn’t require external validation.

From grade-school dances in gyms to corporate happy hours, I’ve been “swiped left” on more than my fair share. You’ll date more attractive men.] As it turns out, my good-looking friends aren’t completely out of touch.

“Online dating is just awkward,” my cute co-worker scrunches her nose. “Classically attractive” women have more difficulty online dating.

And indeed, the Plenty of Fish data showed that more than one in three men say they would be psyched if their date asked them to grab a pumpkin spice latte. Thoughtful ( 28%) This research all comes at a time when more men and women are looking for love online.

Pumpkin spice and guacamole aren’t the only phrases that can get you a date. Fully 15% of American adults say they have used at least one online dating sites and/or mobile dating apps.

According to data from 12,000 profiles released last year from dating site e Harmony.com, a number of words make a potential love interest more likely to respond to you. That’s up from the 11% who reported doing so in early 2013, according to data from last year released by the Pew Research Center.

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